Boiler Safety Program

The Boiler Program’s mission is to provide technical analysis and expertise in all areas of the program for the safety and well being of the citizens, properties and industries in the State of Texas.

The Texas Boiler Law, Chapter 755 of the Health and Safety Code, was enacted on June 3, 1937, after a fatal boiler accident.

Boilers and Boiler Safety

Military Service Members, Veterans, and Spouses - For more information about applying as a military spouse please go to the Military Spouse FAQs page.

Senate Bill 506 was passed during the 83rd Session of the Texas Legislature and signed into law on May 18, 2013. S.B. 506 amends the Boiler Law (Chapter 755 of the Health and Safety Code) to exempt low-pressure food steam cookers from boiler regulation by the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation (TDLR).

Chapter 755 previously classified steam cookers as boilers. The definition of “steam cooker” was added to mean a steam heating boiler that is designed to steam cook food, operated at a pressure not exceeding five pounds per square inch, and equipped with a safety appliance operated at a pressure not exceeding five pounds per square inch.

Chapter 755 was also amended to add steam cookers to the list of items to which the Boiler law does not apply.

These changes are effective as of May 18, 2013.

FAQs

  1. What is a steam cooker?
    A steam cooker is a steam heating boiler designed to steam cook food, operated at a pressure not exceeding five pounds per square inch, and equipped with a safety appliance operated at a pressure not exceeding five pounds per square inch.
  2. Are steam cookers regulated by TDLR?
    No. S.B. 506 adds steam cookers to the list of items to which the Boiler law does not apply.
  3. How do I know if the cooking unit I have is a boiler or a steam cooker?
    If your unit has a Safety Relief Valve that is set at six pounds per square inch (PSI) to fifteen PSI, then your unit is a Steam Heating Boiler. If the Safety Relief Valve is greater than fifteen PSI, then your unit is a Power Boiler. In either case, the unit is a boiler in Texas and is required to be registered with TDLR.
  4. When did these changes to the Boiler law take effect?
    The changes are effective as of May 18, 2013.

Boiler Rule Review - Adoption Justification

Here are the public comments on general topics received during the 2012 Strategic Planning process. The comments are grouped as answers to the four questions we based our discussions on.

  1. What are we doing well?
  2. What can we do better?
  3. If you could change one service that we provide or eliminate or amend any provision of TDLR’s statutes or rules, what would it be?
  4. What major changes will occur over the next five years that will impact the way you do business and the services we provide?

Read the comments (9 kb PDF) To see the comments for each individual license program, go to that program's section on the web site.


Keep your address current with TDLR

WHAT IS A BOILER?

Equipment that falls within the scope of the Texas Boiler Law and Rules, that must be registered and inspected, is defined in both the law and rules. This means all types of boilers that are used in commercial and public facilities that produce steam (either low or high pressure), hot water heating for use in comfort air heating systems, and hot water supply for use in domestic water systems (such as showers, sinks, pools, or for miscellaneous use) which includes potable hot water heater type boilers. Boilers used for hot water supply or potable hot water supply can be further defined in the following two (2) categories:

  • A hot water supply boiler means a boiler designed for operation at a pressure not exceeding 160 psig or temperatures not exceeding 250 degrees Fahrenheit at or near the boiler outlet if the boiler’s: heat input exceeds 200,000 BTUs per hour; water temperature exceeds 210 degrees Fahrenheit; or nominal water-containing capacity exceeds 120 gallons.
  • A potable water heater means a boiler designed for operation at pressures not exceeding 160 psig and water temperatures not exceeding 210 degrees Fahrenheit if the boiler’s: heat input exceeds 200,000 BTUs per hour or nominal water-containing capacity exceeds 120 gallons.

Further classification and definitions can be obtained by accessing the Texas Boiler Law and Rules and referring to the definitions in both the law and rules or by calling (800) 722-7843 and a technical representative can assist you with any questions.

 

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