Seven Myths About Tow Tickets


The Myth - A vehicle owner may sign a tow ticket at the scene of an accident to make the tow a "consent tow."

The Truth - This type of tow is non-consent and may not be changed.

The Myth - A vehicle owner may sign a tow ticket at the scene of an accident to authorize repairs to the vehicle.

The Truth - The owner may only sign documents that authorize tow-related charges.

The Myth - If the vehicle owner wants to take the vehicle to a place other than the VSF, then the vehicle owner has to sign the tow ticket.

The Truth - The owner and the tow operator only need to agree that the vehicle should be towed to someplace other than the VSF.

The Myth - Tow tickets must have the Department complaint and contact information.

The Truth - This isn't required but may be included on the tow ticket, unless your tow ticket is combined with the VSF invoice provided at the time of release from the VSF.

The Myth - A tow ticket is not required to be given at the scene of a traffic incident for a heavy duty tow.

The Truth - If the non-consent tow occurs a tow ticket must be provided if the owner is available.

The Myth - A tow ticket is not required if the vehicle is "dropped" i.e. the vehicle is removed from the tow truck and returned to the owner before it is actually towed.

The Truth - If a fee has been charged then a tow ticket must be provided.

The Myth - Private property tows do not require a tow ticket.

The Truth - Private property tows are non-consent tows must be given a tow ticket.

 

Top of Page | Towing, Storage and VSF Home Page | TDLR Home Page