Dietitians Frequently Asked Questions

Telehealth

1. I am a Texas licensed dietitian. Can I provide telehealth services to clients who live in Texas?

Yes, because the Texas dietitian law and rules do not prohibit the provision of dietetic services via telehealth. An employer, however, may choose to restrict this method of service delivery.

2. I am a Texas licensed dietitian. What if my client who lives in Texas travels or moves to another state? Can I continue to provide services via telehealth?

It depends on the laws and rules that regulate dietitians in that state. You would need to contact the appropriate state licensing board or agency.

3. I am a Texas licensed dietitian. Can I provide telehealth services to clients who do not live in Texas?

It depends on the laws and rules that regulate dietitians in the state where the client is located. You would need to contact the appropriate state licensing board or agency.

4. I am a Texas licensed dietitian. Am I required to have an in-person initial intake session before providing dietetic services by telehealth?

No, if the client is located in Texas. There is no provision of Texas law or rule that requires an in-person initial intake session. If the client is located in another state, you would need to contact the appropriate state licensing board or agency regarding this question.

5. Can a dietitian from another state provide telehealth services to a client who is located in Texas without holding a Texas license?

Yes, unless the state where the dietitian is licensed or located prohibits doing so.

Texas law does not require a Texas dietitian license to practice in Texas. However, Texas law prohibits a dietitian who provides services to Texas clients from using the titles “Licensed Dietitian” or “LD” unless the dietitian holds a Texas license. Additionally, Texas law prohibits a dietitian who provides services to Texas clients from using the term “Registered Dietitian” or “RD” unless the dietitian is currently registered by the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR).

6. What are the confidentiality requirements associated with providing dietetic services via telehealth?

The requirement for a Texas licensed dietitian to protect confidential information applies to all client communications and records, whether services are provided in person or via telehealth.

This requirement may be found in the TDLR rules relating to the Code of Ethics for licensed dietitians. Specifically, rule 16 Texas Administrative Code §116.105(b)(6) states:

“A licensee shall not violate any provision of any federal or state statute relating to confidentiality of client communication and/or records. A licensee shall protect confidential information and make full disclosure about any limitations on his/her ability to guarantee full confidentiality.”

7. Is there reciprocity for licensed or registered dietitians from other states to obtain a Texas license?

There is no reciprocity, but a dietitian currently registered by the Commission on Dietetic Registration may easily obtain a Texas license.

8. Is there reciprocity in other states so that Texas licensed dietitians can obtain a license to practice in another state?

The answer to this question varies by state. You would need to contact the appropriate state licensing board or agency. Please see additional information from the Commission on Dietetic Registration.


License Certificate and Name Change

1. Where am I required to display my license?

The license certificate shall be displayed in the primary office or place of employment of the licensee. In the absence of a primary office or place of employment, or when the licensee is employed at multiple locations, the licensee shall carry a current identification card.

2. Am I able to make a copy of my license?

No, you may not display a photocopy of a license certificate or carry a photocopy of an identification card in lieu of the original document. A file copy shall be clearly marked as a copy across the face of the document.

3. What do I need to submit to TDLR for a name change?

Written notification of name changes must be mailed or faxed to TDLR and shall include a copy of a marriage certificate, court decree evidencing such change, or a social security card reflecting the new name. Download the Notice of Change and Duplicate License Request form (39KB PDF).

4. Will I receive a new license with my updated name after my name change request has been approved?

Not unless you also submit the duplicate/replacement fee to obtain a new license.

5. If I change my name or address, do I notify TDLR?

Yes, you need to notify TDLR in writing. Download the Notice of Change and Duplicate License Request form (39KB PDF).


Fees

1. What are the fees?

All fees paid to TDLR are nonrefundable.

Licensed Dietitian Fees:

Initial application fee (includes two-year initial license)--$108

  • Renewal application fee--$90

License fee for upgrade of provisional licensed dietitian to licensed dietitian--$20

  • Renewal application fee--$45
  • A duplicate/replacement license fee--$25.

Transition from DSHS to TDLR

1. When did the transfer happen?

The Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation (TDLR) assumed all activities relating to the Dietitians program-including licenses and renewals, customer service and enforcement-on October 3, 2016.

2. Now that the transfer is complete, will I need to get a new license issued by TDLR?

No. The license you have now-issued by the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS)-remains valid until its expiration date. When you renew, you will receive a TDLR license.

3. Have the rules changed?

Yes, TDLR adopted rules for all of the transferred programs. Most of the newly adopted rules are very similar, but some changes have been made. The TDLR health profession rules became effective on October 1, 2016.

TDLR adopted additional rule changes to the Dietitians program that were effective July 1, 2018. View the TDLR Dietitians program rules.

4. Have the continuing education process or requirements changed?

No, the continuing education process and requirements remain the same.

5. Why were the licensing programs transferred from DSHS to TDLR?

The transfer is the result of a change to Texas law. In 2015, the Texas Legislature passed Senate Bill 202, which transferred several licensing programs from the DSHS to TDLR.


Communication

1. How do I stay informed about changes impacting me?

You have several options to stay connected:

Email updates - Sign up for email updates to receive notices about rules, the law, fees, examination requirements, meetings, TDLR’s quarterly newsletter, and more. Email updates are the best way for you to stay informed.

Meetings - TDLR’s advisory board and Commission meetings are available to watch online live or later at your convenience. You may also attend these meetings in person.

Facebook and Twitter - TDLR has a Facebook page and Twitter account dedicated to TDLR Health Professions.