Offender Education Programs

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Four types of Offender Education Programs, along with the associated Instructors, are regulated by TDLR:

Drug Offender Education

This standardized program is 15 hours in length and is designed to increase the knowledge of drug offenders by educating them on the dangers of drug abuse and associated illegal activities, to identify their own individual drug-use patterns, and to assist them in developing a personal action plan which will reduce the probability of suffering the consequences of future drug using and illegal behavior.

Specific course topics include history of drug abuse, drug/DWI laws, dynamics of drug use, drugs of abuse, how drugs work, cost of use and abuse, health issues, HIV, interpersonal relationships, deglamorization of drugs, values and behaviors, past and desired behaviors, getting control of your life, resource options, and personal action planning.

DWI Education

The standardized program is 12 hours in length and is designed to help DWI offenders increase their knowledge about alcohol and drugs as these substances relate to driving skills, to identify their own individual drinking/drug use and driving patterns, and to assist them in developing plans which will reduce the probability of future DWI behavior.

Specific course topics include alcohol/drug and traffic safety problems, Texas laws relating to DWI, effects of alcohol/drugs on humans, alcohol/drugs and driving task abilities, chemical dependency, symptoms of dependency, sources of assistance, costs of DWI, and decision-making.

DWI Intervention

This standardized program is 32 hours in length and is designed for multiple DWI offenders and/or others who have alcohol/drug related problems for which the first offender program was not designed to address. The program purpose is to intervene in the alcohol/drug abusing lifestyles of the offenders in order to encourage entry into treatment where indicated as well as to prevent further substance abuse related problems.

Specific course topics include lifestyle issues, values, self-esteem, positive thinking vs. irrational beliefs, responsibility, physiological/psychological effects of drugs, alcoholism, chemical dependency, how drug abuse effects family members, co-dependency, Al-Anon, treatment options, l2-Step Self-Help Groups, peer pressure, relapse prevention, problem solving and action planning.

Alcohol Education for Minors

This program is also known as “Minor in Possession (MIP)”.

This standardized program is six hours in length and is designed to help participants increase their knowledge about alcohol and drugs among young people.
The curriculum contains information on the following topics: societal values related to alcohol consumption by minors, the influence of alcohol advertising on young people, the physical, social and psychological effects of alcohol upon young people; the relationship between motor vehicle and other accidents and alcohol use; relevant laws relating to the purchase, possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages by minors, drinking patterns and problems of young people including abuse and addiction and decision making skills.


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Health Professions Transition FAQs

1. When did the transfer happen?
The Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation (TDLR) assumed all activities relating to the Offender Education Programs including licenses and renewals, customer service and enforcement on November 1, 2017.

2. Now that the transfer is complete, will I need to get a new license issued by TDLR?
No. The license you have now, issued by the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS), remains valid until its expiration date. When you renew, you will receive a TDLR license.

3. Have the rules changed?
Yes, TDLR adopted rules for all of the transferred programs. Most of the newly adopted rules are very similar, but some changes have been made. The TDLR health profession rules became effective on November 1, 2017.

4. What is going to happen with open complaints and cases?
If you filed a complaint with DSHS or had a complaint filed against your license and it was not resolved by the transfer date, TDLR assumed responsibility for the case. You should have already received notification by mail that your complaint was transferred to TDLR.

5. How do I stay informed about changes impacting me?
You have several options to stay connected:

  • Email updates - Sign up for email updates to receive notices about rules, the law, fees, examination requirements, meetings and more. Email updates are the best way for you to stay informed.
  • Meetings - TDLR’s advisory board and Commission meetings are available to watch online live or later at your convenience.
  • Facebook and Twitter - TDLR has a Facebook page and Twitter account dedicated to TDLR Health Professions.

6. Why was my license expiration date extended? Will I have the same expiration date in the future?
To ease the transition, DSHS extended the expiration date by two months for licenses previously set to expire in September, and October, and November 2017. For example, if your original expiration date was September 30, your new expiration date is November 30. If your license was extended, you will continue to renew your license in the new expiration month in the future. Licenses in counties affected by Hurricane Harvey were also extended by DSHS.

7. Will I have to renew on a different schedule?
You will renew on the same schedule unless your license expired in August, September or October 2016. Licenses expiring in those months were extended for two months to ease the transition from DSHS to TDLR. In addition, licenses in counties affected by Hurricane Harvey were also extended by DSHS. If your license was extended, you will now renew in your new expiration month for future renewals. Your license expiration date will not return to your original expiration month.

8. Why were licensing programs transferred from DSHS to TDLR?
The transfer is the result of a change to Texas law. In 2015, the Texas Legislature passed Senate Bill 202, which authorized the transfer of thirteen licensing programs from the DSHS to TDLR. Phase one of this transfer was completed on October 3, 2016 when seven Health-Related Profession programs went live at TDLR.