Code Enforcement Officers

Code Enforcement is the inspection, improvement, and rehabilitation of environmental hazards in public and private premises by determining the presence of fire or health hazards, nuisance violations, unsafe building conditions, and violations of any fire, health, or building regulation, statute, or ordinance.

A Code Enforcement Officer is an agent of this state or a political subdivision of this state who engages in code enforcement and has one year or more of experience in the field of code enforcement. A Code Enforcement Officer-in-Training is an agent of this state or a political subdivision of this state who engages in code enforcement but who has less than one year of experience in the field of code enforcement and is supervised by a registered Code Enforcement Officer.


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Sign up to receive Code Enforcement Officers program email updates. You will receive notices about rules, the law, fees, examination requirements, meetings and more. Email updates are the best way for you to stay informed.

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News and Updates

TDLR Health Monitor - August 2018 Edition

Articles in this August 2018 edition of The Health Monitor include an update on behavior analyst licensing; online supervision reporting for audiologists; TDLR’s Strategic Plan for 2019-2023; rule amendments for the mold program and orthotists and prosthetists program; criminal conviction guidelines for registered sanitarians and code enforcement officers; information for dietitians on telehealth practices; and outreach activities.

The TDLR Health Monitor is a quarterly newsletter that provides news and information about TDLR’s medical and health-related programs. Archives of past editions of the TDLR Health Monitor can be viewed here.

Subject Matter Experts Needed for Examination Review Committee

The Texas Department of Licensing & Regulation (TDLR) and their third-party testing vendor PSI seek your help to serve as Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) for the Examination Review Committee. SMEs are responsible for the review and evaluation of all Code Enforcement Officer examination content, questions and examination reference lists.

If you are interested in applying you should have a broad-based knowledge of the technical aspects of the profession and a familiarity with current techniques, standards and materials. If you would like to be considered as a SME, please complete the Application for the Texas Exam Development Committee (MS Word).

Successful applicants must be willing to sign a confidentiality agreement regarding exam content. The positions of Subject Matter Experts are voluntary and all applications are reviewed by the Education and Examination Division. These are not paid positions. All applications must be received by February 23, 2018. TDLR and the citizens of the State of Texas would like to thank you for considering this opportunity for service.


Advisory Committee Meetings

May 10, 2018 Meeting

The Code Enforcement Officers Advisory Committee met, May 10 in Austin. The agenda and staff reports (PDF) are available online. The meeting was archived and is available on TDLR's YouTube channel.


Health Profession Transition FAQs

1. When did the transfer happen?
The Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation (TDLR) assumed all activities relating to the Code Enforcement Officers program including licenses and renewals, customer service and enforcement on November 1, 2017.

2. Now that the transfer is complete, will I need to get a new license issued by TDLR?
No. The license you have now, issued by the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS), remains valid until its expiration date. When you renew, you will receive a TDLR license.

3. Have the rules changed?
Yes, TDLR adopted rules for all of the transferred programs. Most of the newly adopted rules are very similar, but some changes have been made. The TDLR health profession rules became effective on November 1, 2017.

4. What is going to happen with open complaints and cases?
If you filed a complaint with DSHS or had a complaint filed against your license and it was not resolved by the transfer date, TDLR assumed responsibility for the case. You should have already received notification by mail that your complaint was transferred to TDLR.

5. How do I stay informed about changes impacting me?
You have several options to stay connected:

Email updates Sign up for email updates to receive notices about rules, the law, fees, examination requirements, meetings and more. Email updates are the best way for you to stay informed.

Meetings – TDLR’s advisory board and Commission meetings are available to watch online live or later at your convenience.

Facebook and Twitter – TDLR has a Facebook page and Twitter account dedicated to TDLR Health Professions.

6. Why was my license expiration date extended? Will I have the same expiration date in the future?
To ease the transition, DSHS extended the expiration date by two months for licenses previously set to expire in September, and October, and November 2017. For example, if your original expiration date was September 30, your new expiration date is November 30. If your license was extended, you will continue to renew your license in the new expiration month in the future. Licenses in counties affected by Hurricane Harvey were also extended by DSHS.

7. Will I have to renew on a different schedule?
You will renew on the same schedule unless your license expired in August, September or October 2016. Licenses expiring in those months were extended for two months to ease the transition from DSHS to TDLR. In addition, licenses in counties affected by Hurricane Harvey were also extended by DSHS. If your license was extended, you will now renew in your new expiration month for future renewals. Your license expiration date will not return to your original expiration month.

8. Why were licensing programs transferred from DSHS to TDLR?
The transfer is the result of a change to Texas law. In 2015, the Texas Legislature passed Senate Bill 202, which authorized the transfer of thirteen licensing programs from the DSHS to TDLR. Phase one of this transfer was completed on October 3, 2016 when seven Health-Related Profession programs went live at TDLR.